Get to “Thumping!” Health benefits of Thymus Thumping!

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Let’s face it… we are living in times of high stress and chaos. Busier
lives can mean more anxiety, more illness and more depression. Often times we
turn to western medicines to help combat the symptoms of anxiety. If you were to
ask your friends and neighbors if they take any over the counter or Dr
prescribed med’s to help them through the day I bet you’d be in for a big
surprise. Some may even tell you they’ve turned to unhealthy habits to combat
nerves like over eating, recreational drugs or alcohol. Personally I’ve had it
up to my back teeth with needing crutches to get through life… that’s why I
combat my inner chaos by thymus thumping…otherwise knows as activating the
happy point!
The thymus gland is your immune system’s surveillance gland. The thymus
produces and “educates” T-lymphocytes (T cells), also known as “killer cells”,
which are critical cells of the adaptive immune system.  The thymus is largest
and most active during the neonatal and pre-adolescent periods.  At puberty, the
thymus begins to atrophy and is slowly replaced by fat tissue.  Western medicine
considers this normal however there is also the possibility that this atrophy is
endemic rather than normal. As modern allopathic medicine attempts to overtake
the responsibilities of a healthy immune system, the system stagnates and
atrophies, becoming even less able to fulfill its responsibilities. But even in
an atrophied thymus gland, the production of T cells continues throughout adult
life. As a means to reinstate the singularly important position of our thymus
gland, tapping or thumping the thymus regularly helps to keep it active and
bolsters our immune system & reduces stress.
Simply put, tapping this gland in your chest can…
 reduce anxiety
 increase vitality and strength
 boost the immune system
 regain inner balance
 stimulate all of your energy meridians and chakras
 & even lessen allergies
Some people automatically tap their thymus point when under stress. Have
you ever noticed how people hold their mid chest when an emotional shock comes
their way or if they are feeling faint?  You can also picture Tarzan who would
thump his thymus before moving into a challenging situation! (Gorillas do this
as well!) In my early 20’s I was plagued my panic attacks… it seemed next to
nothing could even set them off. I was taught to tap my chest during these
attacks and within minutes I could feel myself coming back to normal rhythms.
Believe me this was an easy fix that I could do anywhere as needed. It brought
me great relief.
The thymus is located behind the third rib, but any vibrations along the
length of the upper sternum will stimulate it. Here is how to do the thymus
thump!

1. Take a couple of deep, relaxing breaths… in through your nose & out
through your mouth

2. Using your fingertips or side of your fist or your knuckles (refer to
the photo for area) …tap up and down about 2-3 inches along your sternum. You
can do a steady “thump, thump, thump” or create a pattern that suits you best.
Another variation of thumping is to do one thump harder than the rest  such as ”
thump, thump, THUMP, thump, thump, THUMP”

3. Do this for 20-30 seconds and continue to take regular slow breaths.

4. Do this when you first feel a problem coming on… you can do it 1-3 times
a day or up to 4 during times of acute illness.

You will know when you have activated the thymus gland as you will feel a
little tingling or a subtle feeling of ‘joy’ or ‘happiness.’  For some people it
may take a little time before you ‘feel’ anything. Persevere and you will get it
and well worth it.

Learning your bodies natural abilities to combat what life throws at you is
essential for a happy and healthy future. It costs nothing but is completely
priceless!

Happy Thumping!!!

~ Dawn
www.DawnOfAngels.com
Check out my Facebook page for specials on my Angel Intuitive/Psychic Readings, Angel Reiki sessions,  Angel jewelry, Spiritual products for home and body too!
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